Troubleshooting a variety of networking problems typically involves frequent use of the ping command, which can quickly tell you whether or not there is a route between hosts. But what if ping returns with zero packet loss yet you still have problems? Those TCP/IP packets often have to travel through routers or switches and those points can create problems. Fortunately, there's a very handy utility on Windows called pathping that will trace the route between hosts and give you some data on performance or potential bottlenecks. This can be very helpful in diagnosing network problems, especially those related to latency.

 

Here's an example of using pathping:

 

 

C:\Users\guyw>pathping silver

 

Tracing route to sliver.company.com[134.47.135.106]

over a maximum of 30 hops:

  0  DT2.company.com[134.47.52.46]

  1  lanrx.company.com[134.47.53.254]

  2  lan-te1-3.company.com[134.47.104.165]

  3  rd-rg3.company.com[134.47.105.222]

  4  sliver.company.com[134.47.135.106]

 

Computing statistics for 100 seconds...

            Source to Here   This Node/Link

Hop  RTT    Lost/Sent = Pct  Lost/Sent = Pct  Address

  0                                           DT2.company.com[134.47.52.46]

                                0/ 100 =  0%   |

  1    1ms     0/ 100 =  0%     0/ 100 =  0%  lanrx.company.com[134.47.53.254]

                                0/ 100 =  0%   |

  2    9ms     0/ 100 =  0%     0/ 100 =  0%  lan-te1-3.company.com[134.47.104.165]

                                0/ 100 =  0%   |

  3   16ms     0/ 100 =  0%     0/ 100 =  0%  rd-rg3.company.com[134.47.105.222]

                                0/ 100 =  0%   |

  4    1ms     0/ 100 =  0%     0/ 100 =  0%  sliver.company.com[134.47.135.106]

 

Trace complete.