3 Replies Latest reply on Oct 23, 2017 6:02 PM by David Ricketts

    Is there a way to define a subclass?

    kjoubert

      I am using PADS vX.0

       

      You can group nets into a class an assign class rules to it.So far it appears that you can only assign a net to one class. Is there a way to assign a net to multiple classes or subclasses? For example, if I had two board sections such as Analogue and Digital, I can group these nets into their respective class and assign rules or conditional rules. However, if I wanted to further sub divide the nets into Analogue High Voltage and Analogue Low Voltage as a subclass of Analogue, is there a way to do something like that? At the moment, I have to create a tiny class for each region of the design which can sometimes lead to a massive array of rules under certain conditions.

        • 1. Re: Is there a way to define a subclass?
          David Ricketts

          Nets can only be in one class at a time, but you can edit more than one class at once. In your example, name the classes something like ANA_HV and ANA_LV. and then you can select them both to edit the rules they share. You're right in that if you're setting up, say, class to class rules, it can get complicated. If there's a lot, like in my case a high voltage power supply that needed to pass UL rules, I created an external spreadsheet matrix for defining the different clearance requirements based on the 7 voltage classes I had, and used that as the guideline to set up the many class to class rules in PADS. It's a little tedious and can be frustrating, but it works.

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          • 2. Re: Is there a way to define a subclass?
            kbak

            Maybe also using Group and PinPair rules can help you?

            But it can easily get complicated.

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            • 3. Re: Is there a way to define a subclass?
              David Ricketts

              Very good point. They could almost be considered as subclasses if used judicially and then, as you said, make it even more complicated.

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