5 Replies Latest reply on Apr 4, 2018 6:25 AM by Jack

    Plane to Mounting Hole Clarence

    joniengr081

      In VX 2.1 how can I change Plane to Mounting Hole Clarence ? I have looked at the Pad Stack Editor in Library Manager but I do not know if it is the right place to fix it or not. Do I need to do this in Constraint Manager in PCB Xpedition but how ? Can someone share screenshot how to do it please ?

        • 1. Re: Plane to Mounting Hole Clarence
          cathy_terwedow

          Hello, Joni. I've moved your question to the Xpedition community for a quicker response.

          • 2. Re: Plane to Mounting Hole Clarence
            jeff@viavi

            Are you using positive planes?  If so, open Plane Classes and Parameters and then go to the Clearances/Discard/Negative tab and change Mounting Hole/Contour

             

            • 3. Re: Plane to Mounting Hole Clarence
              joniengr081

              Yes it's done. Thanks for reply. I am using positive plane and the data state is dynamic. I have additional question where I can find more information on plane type (positive and negative) and data state (dynamic and static) ?

              • 4. Re: Plane to Mounting Hole Clarence
                tom1919

                Hi Joni

                I don't use VX2.1 but I think the definitions are same.

                The following I find in User's Guide:

                - Positive Planes

                Positive plane data is produced that represents the physical metal that forms the plane. Positive data appears in the design with a clearance around pads does not have the same signal as the plane. Pads with the same net are connected to the plane with tie legs or by being buried.

                - Negative Planes

                Negative data generation produces plane data that represents the clearances for the plane. This type of plane data represents the places where metal does not exist. For plane artwork, the negative of the plotted image is used to represent the plane metal.
                The main advantage of a negative plane over positive is the size of the Gerber file created when processing negative data. Negative plane data can be represented by Gerber flashes for both thermal ties and thermal clearances. This reduces the number of draws needed to represent the
                plane as Gerber data. However, negative planes are difficult to visualize and Batch DRC only checks for shorts between negative planes and other metal objects.

                 

                For data state (dynamic and static), you can try and see the results. I always use dynamic state while designing.

                1 of 1 people found this helpful
                • 5. Re: Plane to Mounting Hole Clarence
                  Jack

                  joniengr081 wrote:

                   

                  Yes it's done. Thanks for reply. I am using positive plane and the data state is dynamic. I have additional question where I can find more information on plane type (positive and negative) and data state (dynamic and static) ?

                  I don't know where you can go to find more information on Plane types, but I can tell you this much:

                   

                  In the olden days (smile) the bare board fabricators preferred negative plane data because the file is much smaller, and when we were transferring Gerber data over 1200baud modems, the positive Plane files were the worst. They also took a long time to plot on the plotter. Negative planes only record the clearances, so whatever is empty space in the file will be copper, whatever is shown in the file will be cleared of copper. For this image the file is much smaller, and on the photo-plotter they just make a "negative" of the image to see the full plane.
                  Positive planes show the copper. You see the Gerber image as exactly what the copper layer will look like in the board.
                  I haven't used a Negative Plane in about twenty years, except for a revision I had to do for someone else.

                   

                  I haven't used the "Static" feature of planes, but from my understanding it is a way to preserve the plane is it was used in a product. If you are documenting a design, archiving the database, you don't want any chance that when the next person loads the design into the software (maybe years later?), you don't want the planes to regenerate. You want to see the plane exactly as it appears in the product. Static planes will not regenerate.

                  1 of 1 people found this helpful